Reviews

Robert Seydel: Contamination and assemblage

Megan N. Liberty writes in ART IN PRINT: “To dissect [his collages] into separate components is to strip them of the qualities with which Seydel—correction, Ruth— imbues them. Collage is a triumph over the dispersion that haunts Benjamin’s collector.”

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John Cage Diary: “Poetic and delightfully meandering”

Lee Ann Norman writes in ARTCRITICAL: “[Cage’s] critical, yet hopeful musings […] capture life’s impermanence as well as Cage’s personal comfort with ambiguity during a time when people around the world were desperately seeking certainty.”

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Robert Seydel: Reading is always an intimate act

Matthew Erickson in THE BELIEVER: “[Seydel’s] work was the result of a private dialogue with a range of artists and writers, with influences echoing off of each other through his daily working cycle, the nights spent processing the texts ingested in the morning.”

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John Cage Diary: “Questions more lucrative than their solution.”

Megan N. Liberty writes in THE BROOKLYN RAIL: “[Editors Biel and Kraft] revive Cage’s interest in chance methods and in effect reperform the journals, treating them as a score to interpret and collaborate with anew.”

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Dorothy Iannone: “To give oneself and yet to remain free.”

Natalie Dunn writes in ENTROPY: “To fully realize its idiosyncrasies and moving portrayals of the quotidian, Iannone asks us to read and consider, to break into laughter, and to give in to moments of surprise.”

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Here Comes Kitty: “No reason, but perhaps a rhyme”

Natalie Helberg writes in NUMÉRO CINQ: “Its intrigue is addictive. It is serene and cataclysmic. It is spiritual, yet sinister. It is all delinquent-joy and death-drive, and yet it is equally inexhaustible, incessantly generating”

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