Women Artists & Hybrid Forms

Suite Vénitienne: Intrusion of her own creation

“In her pursuit of strangers, Calle presents a kind of artistic Zeno’s paradox: the closer you get to someone else, the more you realize the distance separating you.” —Madeleine Schwartz in THE NY REVIEW OF BOOKS

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Dorothy Iannone: The purposeful collision of two

Kate Wolf writes in XTRA: “An evangelist for sexual pleasure and unmitigated female sexuality, Iannone’s bold embrace of sex and love in her work is matched by an equally if not more robust drive toward narrative construction and inventive forms of autobiography.”

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Dorothy Iannone: “What is she offering that we feel we need?”

Catherine Wagely writes in LA REVIEW OF BOOKS: “Because the book does not seem to be about but of Iannone, it presents an ideal opportunity to ask: Why does the 82-year-old artist feel so relevant and sage-like to women decades younger?”

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Dorothy Iannone: “To give oneself and yet to remain free.”

Natalie Dunn writes in ENTROPY: “To fully realize its idiosyncrasies and moving portrayals of the quotidian, Iannone asks us to read and consider, to break into laughter, and to give in to moments of surprise.”

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Suite Vénitienne: “The parallel development of two selves”

David L. Ulin writes in THE LOS ANGELES TIMES: “The point is voyeurism…but it is also, and most essentially, an inquiry into the unbridgeable distances between us, the layers, the nuances, everything we cannot know.”

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Suite Vénitienne: amateur espionage, compulsive curiosity and real excitement

Megan Burbank writes in THE PORTLAND MERCURY: “it’s an immersive piece that, at the intersections of performance, photography, and surveillance, remains hugely influential 35 years later.”

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